Mini Symposia

MS1 - Corrosion and Safety of Existing Concrete Bridges

The aim of this Mini-Symposium is to attract papers that deal with the use of advanced computational and/or experimental techniques for enhancing our knowledge to model, analyze and predict the steel corrosion and safety of deteriorating concrete bridges in an aggressive environment. For existing bridges, multiple environmental and mechanical stressors lead to deterioration of structural performance. Such deterioration will reduce the service life of bridges and increase the life-cycle cost associated with maintenance actions. This Mini-Symposium covers current theoretical and experimental efforts made in the assessment and future prediction of performance, maintenance and strengthening of existing concrete bridges.


MS2 - Innovations and world leading research and practice in Bridge Management Systems

Bridge Management Systems are not only a software system that is a useful tool to help Road Authorities manage their bridge stock but it also describes the overall approach a Road Authority takes to manages its bridges including inspection, maintenance and testing. There are numerous software systems used across the world to assist with bridge management from bespoke systems developed by a Road Authority to commercial systems developed by consultants. There are even more sys tems from the perspective of how a Road Authority manages its bridge stock, many of which have developed over a number of decades. A major challenge that many countries and regions are facing is the integration of these systems into an overall national system to ensure optimisation of the entire network instead of having individual goals, objectives and priorities. This mini-symposium aims to bring together academics and practitioners to explore innovations and world leading research and practice in Bridge Management Systems.


MS3 - Strengthening, Monitoring and Life-cycle Assessment of Steel Bridges

There are a large number of metallic structures, such as railway and highway bridges and off-shore structures, which are aging because of fatigue and corrosion damages. The increasing service loads and harsh environmental conditions make these structures even more vulnerable. There is clearly a need for studies that aim to develop feasible retrofitting techniques for the strengthening of metallic members.

This mini-symposium will share new research results about static and fatigue strengthening of metallic structures using traditional and advanced materials and will provide a platform for re-searchers to discuss their research results and to enhance future collaborations in this topic.


MS4 - Bridge Loading – Measurement and Modelling

Loading is the most variable term in the structural reliability problem. Since resistance modelling is fairly well understood, in the assessment of existing bridges in particular, the accurate estimation of loading can obviate or reduce the need for replacement and rehabilitation measures, potentially offering bridge owners (and society) enormous savings. Continuiiung on from the success of this mini-symposium at IABMAS 2014, this mini-symposium will examine all forms of loading for pedestrian, highway, and railway bridges, including, but not limited to, long- and short-span bridges, vehicle and traffic modelling and measurements, dynamics, statistical analysis, earthquakes, pedestrians and non-linear modelling methods. Those involved in the measurement and modelling of loading, both static and dynamic and the calibration of theoretical models, are particularly encouraged to submit their work for presentation in this mini-symposium.


MS5 - Bridge Safety, Maintenance and Management under Hazards and Changing Climate

Due to the frequent occurrence of hazards, and their effects on bridge life-cycle performance, reliability, risk, and resilience issues have become a global concern. With climate change, hazard intensity and probability of simultaneous occurrence of multi-hazards are expected to increase. This mini-symposium brings together researchers from academia and industry to solve problems of bridge safety, maintenance, and management under natural hazards. Potential topics include: vulnerability and risk assessment, performance-based engineering, and hazard mitigation and management. Emphasis will be placed on papers dealing with effects of climate change on bridges, cost-benefit analysis of adaptation, and bridge design, maintenance, and management specifications.


MS6 - Continuous Bridge Monitoring and Damage Detection

Continuous bridge health monitoring using the latest information technology and sensors will be becoming more challenging issues in the future for maintenance and rehabilitation of existing bridges. And it becomes also an important thing that how to detect damages from such huge number of monitoring data, that is a big challenge for analysis to discover the damage information of a target bridge. Then we propose a Mini-Symposium on continuous bridge monitoring and damage detection by long term monitoring for discussing from various point of view.


MS7 - Centenary bridges - An insight into construction and technology history

It is worth recognizing the outstanding contribution of centenary bridges to the valorisation of world heritage and their importance in creating a strong identity of the territories in which they are implemented. The great diversity of technical solutions and materials – steel, concrete, masonry and timber – deserves a worldwide diffusion and recognition. This Mini-Symposium represents an opportunity to pay a tribute to the engineers involved in the design and construction of those bridges and to give a valuable insight into the construction and technology history.


MS8 - Monitoring and Assessment of Bridges using Novel Techniques

Assessment and monitoring concepts for bridges become more and more important in the intervention planning (e.g., maintenance, repair, rehabilitation, replacement) for new and existing bridges. Nevertheless, there is still a strong demand for the development and efficient use of novel techniques for monitoring and assessment of bridges. These techniques affect intervention and maintenance strategies and in consequence cost optimization concepts. Therefore, the objective of this Mini-symposium is to highlight the recent developments in science and practice and to formulate the next necessary steps. This Mini-symposium provides the opportunity to disseminate and discuss novel techniques regarding assessment, monitoring and maintenance techniques of bridges.


MS9 - Bridge Safety Evaluation and Risk Assessment: Code Requirements vs. Practical Considerations

  • Ming Liu, CIVIL

    NAVFAC - EXWC, PORT HUENEME, CALIFORNIA, USA

    mliu168@hotmail.com
  • Hani Nassif, PROFESSOR OF CIVIL ENGINEERING

    RUTGERS UNIVERSITY, THE STATE UNIVERSITY OF NEW JERSEY, PISCATAWAY, NEW JERSEY, USA

    nassif@rci.rutgers.edu

The principles and methodologies in bridge safety evaluation and risk assessment may vary in different regions of the world, resulting in quite different code requirements. The practical considerations to satisfy these code requirements are even more diverse. Current performance-based bridge safety evaluation trends to be more reasonable for risk-informed decision-making in bridge rehabilitation and retrofit. Thus, development of the performance-based code requirements itself becomes critical. This MS/SS brings bridge engineers and researchers around the world to share and exchange their practices to provide a new avenue for improving the code requirements in bridge rehabilitation


MS10 - Construction Management Issues in Bridge Engineering and Construction

Construction management issues in bridge construction constitute particular challenges. Applying Value Engineering in the design and construction of new bridges and upgrading old ones results in more economic and sustainable bridges and enormous savings. Bridge assessment should consider the differences between old and new ones, and applicable threshold values whether from the original or current codes, to avoid severe consequences. Arbitration can save time and costs. Recent developments in such issues result in advancing the current state of knowledge and practice.

This Mini Symposium aims at attracting new papers from researchers, practitioners and public agencies to present recent techniques, theoretical developments and practical applications, and state-of-the-art/practice and case studies. Sessions will provide a platform to discuss and share various issues of construction management in bridges. These include (but not limited to): Value Engineering; Bridge Construction Contracts; Contracts Administration; Arbitration; Applicable Codes.


MS11 - European Standardization of Quality Specifications for Roadway Bridges

During the implementation of asset management strategies, maintenance actions are required to keep assets at desired performance levels. In case of roadway bridges, performance indicators are established for components. These indicators allow to assess if quality control plans are accomplished. In Europe there is a large disparity regarding the way indicators are quantified and goals specified. COST Action TU1406 aims to bring together research and practicing communities in order to establish a European guideline in this issue. In IABMAS-2016, the preliminary results of the Action were presented. In this special session of IABMAS-2018, the new findings related to the required performance goals, the research performance indicators still under investigation and the way these results will be implemented on a guideline for quality specifications will be presented. Also a set of case studies will be shown regarding the practical application of the guideline in different countries and for several groups of bridges. Finally, the necessary steps to follow leading to the standardization of the proposed quality specifications will be presented.


MS12 - Innovative Methods in Strengthening of Concrete Bridges

Concrete bridges are being subjected to increasing demands such as: population growth, higher volumes of commuter and freight traffic and heavier vehicles. Further, environmental deterioration, damage and design defects all contribute to the rise of existing structures which require strengthening. Traditional bridge strengthening methods such as externally bonded steel plates, concrete and steel jacketing have largely been superseded by fiber reinforced polymers (FRP’s) due to their light weight, high tensile strength, resistance to corrosion and durability. There is currently a need for further studies into state of the-art bridge strengthening technologies and the aim of this session is to focus on the latest research, development and field applications in the area of strengthening of concrete bridges using FRP and other innovative technologies.


MS13 - CIM: Community Information Modeling - the new frontier of Civil Engineering

Critical infrastructures in urbanized area represent the primary systems for feeding human activities. Interruption to just one of them can have consequences across others. They comprise multiple networks (e.g. from water supply to oil and gas, from electric to transportation). Their role is emphasized under emergency, where e.g. the transportation system plays a primary role in managing the aid activities. They are also interconnected statically and dynamically, directly and indirectly, on multiple levels.

Bringing together activities of numbers of people within complex urbanized areas, critical infrastructures can lead to vulnerability from multiple hazards. The identification of critical points, the determination of the implications of failures, with respect to the interconnectivities, represents the key for decreasing vulnerability. One emerging approach to these challenges focuses on resilience defined here as the degree to which a system can continue to function effectively in a changing environment.

This MS13 is focused on the presentation of approaches that can be used for managing and assessing resilience of critical infrastructures. Virtual testbeds and numerical simulations can be used for modeling interdependencies between buildings, bridges and transportation systems, utility and the socioeconomic systems within the community that they support. The same approaches can be useful to estimate impact effects and recovery trajectories.

The MS13 is oriented to several participants, such as academic staff, researchers, post-graduate students and professional engineers dealing with the following advanced topics:

  • probabilistic risk analysis and decision making;
  • resilience;
  • crisis management simulations;
  • vulnerability;
  • optimization, reliability and/or robustness, redundancy and damage-tolerant design.

MS14 - Advanced computational and experimental techniques for extreme load performance of bridges

Bridge structures are usually designed under a wide range of uncertainties, regarding the extreme loads that they are required to sustain during their service life. One of the major challenges facing structural engineers, today, is to develop creative ways to reduce the risk of catastrophic damage due to these extreme loads, and to enhance the resiliency of urban infrastructure. However, this requires the prediction of the structural response from the linear-elastic range to levels approaching collapse and thus poses significant challenges. This mini-symposium focuses on the development and use of advanced computational and experimental techniques for structural assessment and evaluation of bridges under extreme loads.


MS15 - Footbridges: Advances in Vibration Serviceability Assessment

Recent decades have seen a significant increase in problems associated with the vibration serviceability of long slender footbridges. These problems stem from much-improved analysis and design rules, which result in highly-efficient structural forms. Unfortunately, our understanding of human-induced loading has not increased at the same rate, and so problems are observed with cutting-edge designs. Fortunately, the last decade or so has seen a tremendous increase in research attention, outputs, and knowledge dedicated to resolving this problem. The aims of this mini-symposium are to: (1) Provide a forum for further dissemination and discussion of research advances in the area; (2) Provide an outlet for industry case studies and best practices in footbridge vibration serviceability design, and; (3) Improve visibility of this specialized field amongst the wider bridge engineering community. Researchers in the field are encouraged to submit their work to this mini-symposium. Practitioners are particularly encouraged to share their case studies and best practice solutions also. Melbourne is a city of footbridges - an ideal venue for this informative mini-symposium.


MS16 - Life-Cycle Structural Redundancy, Robustness and Resilience of Bridges under Multiple Hazards

Notable events of bridge collapses due to accidental loads, environmental aggressiveness and related phenomena, such as corrosion and fatigue, indicated structural redundancy and robustness as key factors for a rational approach to life-cycle design of deteriorating bridges and infrastructure systems. Structural resilience is also an important indicator in bridge engineering to express the capability of bridge structure and infrastructure systems exposed to extreme events, such as earthquakes, to withstand the load effects and to recover efficiently the original configuration. However, the concepts of redundant, robust and resilient structures, or damage-tolerant structures, are still issues of controversy, since there are no well established and generally accepted criteria for a consistent definition and a quantitative measure of these performance indicators. The aim of this Mini-Symposium is to present advances on this subject and to provide conceptual and analytical design tools that can effectively be implemented in design practice for measuring and evaluating the life-cycle redundancy, robustness and resilience of bridge structures and infrastructures under multiple hazards, with emphasis on the interaction between seismic and environmental hazards in aggressive environments.


Mini-Symposium organized on behalf of the SEI/ASCE Technical Council on Life-Cycle Performance, Safety, Reliability and Risk of Structural Systems, Task Group 2 on Reliability-based Structural System Performance Indicators.

  • Key Dates
  • Call for Abstracts Open March 2017
  • Registration Open July 2017
  • Abstract Submission Deadline extended 2 July 2017
  • Notification of Acceptance of Abstract July 2017
  • Full Paper Submission open June 2017
  • Full Paper Final Submission November 2017
  • Notification of Full Paper acceptance December 2017
  • Earlybird closes March 2018
  • Conference 9-13 July 2018

IABMAS 2018 Hosted by

Vic Roads

Mondash University

Swinburne University

RMIT University

Expression of Interest.